Natural Baby Belle

Monday, March 21, 2011

Hello all,

You know when you walk around the mall on a weekend when all the families are up and about eating out and you see that one (or more nowadays) little girl with amazingly long and healthy curly hair... that right there just brings a smile to my face.

Natural hair care for a child takes time, patience and practice; the key thing to remember is that a little goes a long way. By this I mean all around 'less'! Less product, less manipulation and less stress!

0-2 years

Toddlers usually have sporadic hair growth patterns, parents need not bother or worry too much or fuss about hair growth at this point.

A clean scalp is essential for a baby's general development. Detangle the hair gently before a wash with your fingers. This will take a very gentle patient hand. Proceed to wash the babies hair using mild baby shampoo, as always DILUTE the shampoo. Be careful when cleansing the baby's central scalp portion. Baby hair still needs its natural oils for healthy hair, so be sure to keep wash days down to twice a week.

A simple bow may be all that you need to accessorize

Moisturizing is best accomplished using natural ingredients. Make a simple spritz made from pure water and extra virgin oil (jojoba, olive oil or coconut oil). I would skip the essential oil as these oils can be extremely powerful and the baby's sensitive scalp may not react well to them. I would also leave out the glycerin, but that is my personal preference; I like to keep it extra simple.

I am sure you have all heard the old wives tale that shaving off your babies hair will encourage growth. There is no evidence to support this, it will help with general maintenance and cleansing but will not aid growth in any way... I say let the hair be.

3 and up
Moisture is key! (I say that all the time don't I? I need to pick up a new phrase...) But seriously, regular moisturizing is essential for your child's natural hair development. Purchase a moisture rich conditioner and go to town!


Use conditioner when detangling; this is especially important as kids get a bit testy when it comes to the getting them to sit down for it. Take your time; this ordeal will be over soon and the both of you can move on with your lives. If done well, there should be NO 'ouches'. Use a lot of conditioner and work your way from the tips to the roots section by section.

"If there's one thing I regret about going natural, it's that I didn't do it sooner" Anon

I adore this picture. It's perfect

There are loads of products out there for moisturizing; I love the Kids Organics Shea Butter lotion. I use it on my hair and my nieces as well. (Please note that the new label is slightly different). This product has amazing slip and also reduces tangles. It is available in major super stores and Super Cosmetics, Our Price... to name a few.

When shopping for a product, remember the basics; avoid mineral oil based products, sodium lauryl/laureth sulphate (found in shampoos), Parabens (conditioners and shampoos), and all the other badies... (post coming up for those of you who need more information on the ingredients to look out for.)


Natural hair at any age grows and flourishes when in protective styles. The most popular style that most parents opt to adorn on their natural haired beauties are two strand twists, (complete with the cute bands at the tips and base.)


Three strand twists (rastas) natural cornrows (no added extensions) and loose buns are great protective styles to adopt. Never employ styles that pull or tug on the hair line (or hair in general); this could stunt the hair development causing traction alopecia.

Simple and age appropriate

I wouldn't advise having braids put in until the child is 8 and older; (again this is just my personal preference) if done, try to make them as large, chunky and lightweight as possible.

She is adorable!!!

Natural Beauty

Call me immature, but I have mad fro-envy

There will be more detailed posts on Natural Hair care for Children coming up! I think a solid foundation is the root (pun intended) for a future filled with healthy and beautiful natural hair.

Thank you all for reading.

Disclaimer: I would like to note that I claim no ownership over any of the images above. I attribute Google as my main source; I would like to state that I will immediately take down any image should the rightful owner have me take them down. Although I am not a parent, I would totally understand if they would prefer to not have their child's image up in the net.

9 comments:

Nancie Mwai said...

yaaay the post is up!x

Chilli Mango said...

Greatstuff!!

Nyachomba said...

Mary..This is such a well done post and I love the little munchkins especially the little girl with the blown out fro (what are you doing to me mami,maternal instincts Eeeekkk!!)
Very informative though

Voe said...

hey :) i love love the post. and the little girls have beautiful hair. especially the little one with a fro thats twice as large as her head, she's in a dress with green, white and black. maybe she's the same little girl Nyash mentioned with the blow out fro. i hope some day to rock a blow out fro like that. my number one dream and ambition :) :)

Anonymous said...

Very informative. I agree with you on the braids, extensions on really young kids only put tension on the hair resulting in breakage.

For really young kids, I'd say letting the hair be is best. I've seen tight ponytails, twists on sparse hair barely covering the scalp and all I can do is cringe. Stay away from relaxers and perms, even if you know how to maintain them. I know this sounds old school but prolonged chemical use finally leads to problems for most people, so even if the child wants a perm, postpone it as long as you can.

S

Anonymous said...

Nice post ladies, I like the disclaimer at the end, although the parents put the pictures up themselves and you just found them and accredited them to google. So don't sweat it.

My daughter has thick 4b hair (which is very different from my 3c hair), I have to be extra careful with her maintenance, but I can't wait to see her hair grow out, I love how thick it is already, she's only five.

I'm looking forward to more posts such as this.

Anonymous said...

hi, i digress abit, could you guys please do a write up with pics about different hairstyles for naturals in like kawaida english, (as in kenya english/ swahili), when you say flat twists e.t.c some of us are really on float mode.com...we are used to matutas e.t.c

Nyachomba said...

@S I do not agree with perming a babies hair..I for one will never ever perm my babies hair...I think we have suffered enough with perms on most of our heads aint no way I am putting any of my kids through that...my own personal choice though. Thanks for the input though
@MommyAnonymous We shall definitely do more posts like these and I might try steal my nieces hair and do tutorials for you...
@Anonymous...I am not sure what you mean by kawaida english but we shall try.....flat twists are just what the word says..twists done flat on the head like cornrows. We pride ourselves on the ability to communicate our ideas but we shll defo take in your input.

Nyachomba said...

@S I do not agree with perming a babies hair..I for one will never ever perm my babies hair...I think we have suffered enough with perms on most of our heads aint no way I am putting any of my kids through that...my own personal choice though. Thanks for the input though
@MommyAnonymous We shall definitely do more posts like these and I might try steal my nieces hair and do tutorials for you...
@Anonymous...I am not sure what you mean by kawaida english but we shall try.....flat twists are just what the word says..twists done flat on the head like cornrows. We pride ourselves on the ability to communicate our ideas but we shll defo take in your input.